81% of teachers have been vaccinated or hired, according to a union study

The latest metric is a step forward in President Biden’s call in early March to prioritize teacher immunizations on April 1, but also shows that a portion of teachers are still awaiting their immunization.

“Let’s treat personal learning as an important service,” Mr Biden said in his March 2 address, “And that means getting the key staff to provide that service – teachers, school staff, child care workers – get vaccinated immediately. They are important employees.”

A new teacher survey conducted by the second largest national teachers’ union since April 1 at least 81% of teachers had been vaccinated against COVID-19 or were scheduled to receive their firearms, according to data shared with by the union.

The latest metric is a step forward in President Biden’s call in early March to prioritize teacher immunizations on April 1, but also shows that a portion of teachers are still awaiting their immunization.

“Let’s treat personal learning as an important service,” Mr Biden said in his March 2 address, “And that means getting the key staff to provide that service – teachers, school staff, child care workers – get vaccinated immediately. They are important employees.”

“We want every educator, schoolworker, child care worker to get at least one gun by the end of March,” Mr Biden said.

At the time of the presidential directive, 30 states were already prioritizing teachers for vaccination. The president is scheduled to visit a vaccine center in Virginia on Tuesday afternoon.

Of the 18% teachers who have not been vaccinated or have not had an appointment, about half – 48% – say they do not plan to be shot, according to the study, citing skepticism, lack of research, or a desire for more information. This means that about 10% of the total teachers in the study said they would not be vaccinated.

A nationwide survey of members of the American Federation of Teachers, conducted by Hart Research, also showed that 85% of teachers practice some form of teaching internally, either full-time or part-time, with 14% of respondents claiming to be teaching only approximately.

They were also asked if teachers and students needed to get medicine back to school.

If the COVID-19 vaccines were to be safe and effective by the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 46% of teachers in the study said that students should be vaccinated, and 44% said they should not, to prevent medical exemptions. and religious.

The majority of teachers – 50% – also said they did not believe the vaccine should be vaccinated, and 43% said it should be necessary, according to the study.

“There is still a race between the vaccine and the alternative,” AFT President Randi Weingarten said in a statement. “But this vote shows that AFT members are aware of the importance of schooling. They want to come back, the process of reopening is strong and if we instill trust and experience real fears we can finally end this nightmare national dream.”

Sixty percent of the teachers in the study also said that their schools had a COVID-19 test program.

The survey included 57% Democrats and 17% self-proclaimed Republicans, conducted from March 26 to April 1 and had a 3.4% error in responding to K-12 teachers.